Chinese Drywall Inspection Confirms Toxic Chinese Drywall in Palm Bay

Chinese Drywall confirmed in a Palm Bay, FL neighborhood

Toxic Chinese Drywall

I was called out to do a Chinese drywall inspection on a home that was built in 2006. This beautiful home was located in a gated community neighborhood in the Melbourne / Palm Bay area on the Space Coast of Florida.
The concerning thing is that this paticular home was the model home when this entire was in the construction phase. So this mean that the whole neighbor hood could potentially have the toxic Chinese Drywall!
The home was all set for closing when the final home inspection came back as “Possible Chinese Drywall” due to the home being built in the timeframe when Chinese drywall was being shipped here to the East Coast of the United States by the container and ship load..

When I arrived to the home for the Chinese drywall inspection there was a strong odor that smelt like rotten eggs (sulphur). And there was also black corrosion on any copper and also on the the a/c coils. The mirrors in the bathrooms had pitting and desilvering. These are all are the classic symptoms of a toxic Chinese drywall.

Toxic Chinese Drywall Confirmed!

Unfortunately the only remedy for this home is to gut the entire interior from the band new hardwood, carpet, tile, cabinets, ceiling fans, light fixtures, air conditioning system, drywall, metal framing, tubs, showers, baseboards and doors.

Pretty much the home will be back down to only a cement block shell!


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by Florida Drywall Contractor- Paul Peck Lic.#RX11066969

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Toxic Chinese Drywall Identification Method

(1) An initial or threshold inspection to find visual signs of metal corrosion and evidence of drywall installation during the relevant time period, and

(2) The identification of corroborating evidence or characteristics.

The identification process is two steps:

Step 1: Threshold Inspection

(a) Blackening of copper electrical wiring and/or air conditioning evaporator coils; and

(b) The installation of new drywall (for new construction or renovations) between 2001 and 2008. A positive result for this step (including both criteria) is a prerequisite to any further consideration.

Visual inspection must show:

Step 2: Corroborating Evidence

Because it is possible that corrosion of metal in homes can occur for other reasons, it is important to obtain additional corroborating evidence of problem Chinese Drywall. Homes with the characteristic metal corrosion problems must also have at least 2 of these corroborating conditions if the new drywall was installed between 2005 and 2008.
For installations between 2001 and 2004, at least 4 of the following conditions must be met. Collecting evidence of these corroborating conditions will in some cases require professional assessors and/or testing by analytical laboratories.

(a) Corrosive conditions in the home, demonstrated by the formation of copper sulfide on copper coupons (test strips of metal) placed in the home for a period of 2 weeks to 30 days or confirmation of the presence of sulfur in the blackening of the grounding wires and/or air conditioning coils;

(b) Confirmed markings of Chinese origin for drywall in the home;

(c) Strontium levels in samples of drywall core found in the home (i.e. excluding the exterior paper surfaces) exceeding 1200 parts per million (ppm);

(d) Elemental sulfur levels in samples of drywall core found in the home exceeding 10 ppm;

(e) Elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide and/or carbon disulfide emitted from samples of drywall from the home when placed in test chambers using ASTM Standard Test Method D5504-08 or similar chamber or headspace testing;

(f) Corrosion if copper metal to form copper sulfide when copper is placed in test chambers with drywall samples taken from the home.
Florida Department of Health

Always contact your local building department to see if a building permit is required for the work you need and if a state or locally licensed contractor is required to do the job.

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Chinese drywall mystery solved!

Chinese drywall mystery? Sulfur smell and corrosion tests negative for Chinese Drywall.

I received a call from a realtor that stated a house that was on the market had been flagged during the routine home inspection after the buyers offer had been accepted. The inspector had found black corrosion on copper water lines and there was a strong smell of sulphur in the house is what caused him write “Possible Chinese drywall” in his inspection report. So until this home was inspected by a chinese drywall expert this sale was on hold if not lost.

So I proceeded to ask all the usual questions when I get contacted about Chinese drywall.


  • What year was the house built? Realtor say’s: 2001

  • Have there been any renovations or any type of drywall repairs or ceiling repairs? Realtor: Yes a kitchen remodel

  • Is there any visible corrosion? Realtor: Yes

  • Is there a sulphur smell in the home? Realtor: Yes

  • After answering my Chinese drywall questions, I told the Realtor that based on his answers I thought the only possibility for there to be Chinese drywall would have been from a renovation or drywall repairs had been done after 2004. But, based on the corrosion and the sulphur smell I thought Chinese drywall at the home could be a possibility. So the realtor wanted to make an appointment for me to come to the home in question and do a Visual Chinese Drywall Evaluation as soon as possible.

    Chinese Drywall Mystery Inspection Day!

    Upon entering this Palm Bay, FL home a very strong odor of sulfur was apparent.

    I started the chinese drywall inspection in the kitchen and saw that the kitchen sink had yellow staining and underneath the kitchen cabinets the hot and cold water lines corrosion on them.

    Chinese drywall mystery- Kitchen sink

    Yellow stains in the kitchen sink


    Chinese drywall- Kitchen sink supply line corrosion

    Kitchen sink supply line corrosion

    The dishwasher water supply line also had corrosion and was black.

    Chinese drywall mystery- Dishwasher pulled out

    Dishwasher pulled out


    Chinese drywall mystery- Dishwasher supply line corrosion

    Dishwasher supply line corrosion


    I next went into the guest bathroom and saw corrosion on the water lines and some of the faucets minimal corrosion in the tub of the guest bathroom.

    Next, I checked the Guest bedrooms and living room and saw no corrosion whatsoever.

    The dining room had corrosion on the copper ground wire on the chandelier

    Moving onto the master bedroom I saw a really no corrosion in
    the bedroom but a lot of corrosion in the master bathroom from the water line to
    the toilet, faucets and major corrosion at the Jacuzzi tub drain.

    Chinese drywall- Toilet supply line corrosion

    Toilet supply line corrosion


    Chinese drywall mystery- Master bathroom sink supply line corrosion

    Master bathroom sink supply line corrosion


    Chinese drywall- Master bath jacuzzi tub drain

    Master bath jacuzzi tub drain


    Chinese drywall- Jacuzzi tub drain corrosion

    Jacuzzi tub drain corrosion

    Then into the garage and laundry room, there was no corrosion on the 7 year
    old AC coils and no corrosion on the 4 year old water heater.

    Water heater was  manufactured in 2011

    Water heater was manufactured in 2011


    Water heater has no corrosion

    Water heater has no corrosion

    While in the garage I went into the attic to see if I could see any manufacturing dates on the back of the ceiling drywall. All of the drywall that I could see up there was dated 08/24/2000.

    Chinese drywall tests negative mfg date 2000

    Chinese drywall tests negative mfg date 2000

    The Chinese drywall mystery is starting to unravel…

    One of my first questions was if this home was connected to city water or well water inside?

    I had asked the real estate agent that was there at the home for the
    Chinese drywall inspection, if the owner had lived alone or if there was other people that lived
    with her? Simply because there was no corrosion in the guest bathroom tub and
    major corrosion in the master bathroom tub. Which made me curious as to why it
    would be so bad in the master and nothing in the guest tub.

    The real estate agent responded that he thought the woman lived alone. That kind of got my
    curiosity going about the well water, which a lot of times has a sulfur smell
    which would explain why the home smells like sulfur from the water sprinklers
    being on.

    Once back at the office I called the city of Palm Bay to ask if city water had
    always been at the Chinese drywall mystery home since 2001?

    The next day I received a call from a City of Palm Bay employee stating that there were three different phases in the Port Malabar Unit 7 area where the water had been switched over well water to city water. At this particular address it was switched over to city water during the (Phase 3) portion. Which was completed in July of 2005.

    In conclusion of the visual Chinese drywall inspection and a phone call to the
    city of Palm Bay:

    I have found this Palm bay home to not contain Chinese drywall due to the fact
    that:

    1) The home was built in 2001

    2) After looking at the back of the drywall in the
    attic, the drywall was from August 2000.

    3) AC coils that were seven years old had no corrosion.

    4) Water heater that was two years old had no corrosion.

    5) Guest bathroom tub had no corrosion because the lady that was selling the home lived by herself and didn’t use this shower or tub.

    6) Master bathroom tub master sink, kitchen sink had corrosion on the hot and cold water supply line and yellow staining from the sulphur gases and well water.

    7) Sulfur smell in the home was coming from the water sprinkler shallow well
    system. Along with the standing sprinkler water in multiple flower pots including decaying plants at the front entrance of the home, which can also put off a strong sulfur gas.

    8) After talking to the city of Palm Bay and finding out that the home had
    been on well water for over four years before switching over to city water told me that this was not Chinese drywall but well water and the sulfur within it causing the corrosion to mimic the symptoms of Chinese drywall.

    Chinese Drywall Mystery Solved!

    Paul Peck
    Chinese Drywall inspections by a Florida Drywall Contractor- Lic.#RX11066969

    Chinese Drywall is here in Brevard County, Florida

    I have seen numerous homes affected by Chinese Drywall here in Brevard County, Florida. Also, Orange County, Volusia county and Indian River County are reporting it as well.

    There are some simple tests that can performed if you suspect that your potential clients home or business has Chinese drywall, we are prepared to perform a few checks as recommended by the State of Florida to confirm the possibility of tainted drywall.

    Chinese Drywall is here in Brevard County, Florida.

    States with chinese drywall reported.

    Palm Bay, Florida home built in 2005:
    Affected by Chinese Drywall

    After being contacted to do a Chinese drywall inspection by the new owners of this home, I set up the appointment for the next day. As soon as I walked in the door it smelt like rotten eggs and my eyes started to immediately burn.

    By the end of the Chinese drywall inspection, it was determined that the entire interior of this home contained Chinese drywall throughout including the garage drywall and the drywall ceiling on the pool patio as well.

    Chinese Drywall in Brevard County, FL

    Chinese Drywall in Brevard County, FL


    The AC’s copper line is corroded. The copper on the inside of this unit is even worse.
    Ac Copper Corrosion

    Ac Copper Corrosion


    Copper corrosion

    Copper corrosion

    More corrosion in the shower.

    Shower corrosion

    Shower corrosion

    Water supply lines were also corroded.

    Corroded Water line and flange.

    Corroded Water line and flange.

    Chinese Drywall markings:

    Chinese Drywall Markings

    Chinese Drywall Markings


    Identification Method

    (1) an initial or threshold inspection to find visual signs of metal corrosion and evidence of drywall installation during the relevant time period, and

    (2) the identification of corroborating evidence or characteristics.

    The identification process is two steps:

    Step 1: Threshold Inspection

    (a) Blackening of copper electrical wiring and/or air conditioning evaporator coils; and

    (b) The installation of new drywall (for new construction or renovations) between 2001 and 2008. A positive result for this step (including both criteria) is a prerequisite to any further consideration.

    Visual inspection must show:

    Step 2: Corroborating Evidence

    Because it is possible that corrosion of metal in homes can occur for other reasons, it is important to obtain additional corroborating evidence of problem Chinese Drywall. Homes with the characteristic metal corrosion problems must also have at least 2 of these corroborating conditions if the new drywall was installed between 2005 and 2008.
    For installations between 2001 and 2004, at least 4 of the following conditions must be met. Collecting evidence of these corroborating conditions will in some cases require professional assessors and/or testing by analytical laboratories.

    a) Corrosive conditions in the home, demonstrated by the formation of copper sulfide on copper coupons (test strips of metal) placed in the home for a period of 2 weeks to 30 days or confirmation of the presence of sulfur in the blackening of the grounding wires and/or air conditioning coils;

    (b) Confirmed markings of Chinese origin for drywall in the home;

    (c) Strontium levels in samples of drywall core found in the home (i.e. excluding the exterior paper surfaces) exceeding 1200 parts per million (ppm);

    (d) Elemental sulfur levels in samples of drywall core found in the home exceeding 10 ppm;

    (e) Elevated levels of hydrogen sulfide, carbonyl sulfide and/or carbon disulfide emitted from samples of drywall from the home when placed in test chambers using ASTM Standard Test Method D5504-08 or similar chamber or headspace testing;

    (f) Corrosion if copper metal to form copper sulfide when copper is placed in test chambers with drywall samples taken from the home.
    Florida Department of Health

    Always contact your local building department to see if a building permit is required for the work you need and if a state or locally licensed contractor is required to do the job.

    Schedule your Chinese Drywall Inspection estimate here

    Please E-mail us for more information about our Chinese drywall inspection services.